xpectopatronads:

thesmokingwolf:

Dean O’Gorman on Stephen Hunter in the "Thorins’ Company" behind the scenes.

neomiko
ejejejejehjeheheehehehhehehe

xpectopatronads - He is me

Myers-Briggs Tag Game

Tag game: Characters who share the same personality type as you.

Tagged by: jacksososorootly

If you don’t know your personality type, take the test here.

Rules: Find out what characters share the same personality type as you here and list the characters that you find relevant below. Then tag five friends and let them know you tagged them!

Personality type: INTJ, The Analyst

People who should do the thing: @xpectopatronads @pingucat @mypantsflewoff @geekymoxie crystalmage

fatallywhimsical:

benedictbooty:

Remember Wendy Davis?

image

You know, the badass democrat who fillibustered for 11 hours straight to conserve women’s rights in Texas?

image

Well, this wonderful and amazing woman has announced her campaign for Texas governor!

image

Let’s show her some goddamn support!

Her opponent, Greg Abbott, is all about “traditional values.”

 What fucking good have “traditional values” ever done for anyone?

Not a goddamn thing, that’s what. Vote for Wendy Davis.

Shit I didn’t think it’d take me 4 hours o write that article and yet

I rarely post selfies but this is one of my favorites with a friend at The Last Bookstore in DTLA. 

I’m holding a book of Bukowski poetry I bought that day.

I rarely post selfies but this is one of my favorites with a friend at The Last Bookstore in DTLA.

I’m holding a book of Bukowski poetry I bought that day.

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential
When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.
But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.
Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.
The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.
Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.
From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”
“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.
While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.
When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.
“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.
A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.
“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”
Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.
“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.
As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.
The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.
Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.
Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses
Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.
Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.
Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential

When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.

But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.

Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.

The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.

Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.

From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”

“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.

While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.

When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.

“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.

A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.

“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”

Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.

“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.

As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.

The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.

Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.

Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.

Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.

Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

Can’t believe I have a cold. Gonna burn it out with spicy andouille sausage/veg soup and orzo #food

Can’t believe I have a cold. Gonna burn it out with spicy andouille sausage/veg soup and orzo #food

therandomactorg:

Ever wondered what it’s like to be a part of the Random Acts team? Well, here’s your chance to find out! We’re looking for an amazing Marketing Manager, as well as some new members for our awesome Development Team: a Development Manager, Development Officer and a Development Assistant.
If you’d like to join us in making the world a better place one random act of kindness at a time, just drop by our website.  You can email our HR Manager if you have questions at HR@theRandomAct.org.
The last date to apply is September 21. 
P.S. You can find a full list of requirements for each position on our website, but the most important one is having a kind heart.

therandomactorg:

Ever wondered what it’s like to be a part of the Random Acts team? Well, here’s your chance to find out! We’re looking for an amazing Marketing Manager, as well as some new members for our awesome Development Team: a Development Manager, Development Officer and a Development Assistant.

If you’d like to join us in making the world a better place one random act of kindness at a time, just drop by our website.  You can email our HR Manager if you have questions at HR@theRandomAct.org.

The last date to apply is September 21. 

P.S. You can find a full list of requirements for each position on our website, but the most important one is having a kind heart.

So I’ve got NBCSN on the telly right now because I was watching the LA Galaxy absolutely destroy the Colorado Rapids earlier. I haven’t been paying much attention since then because I fell into the black hole that is Tumblr (and catching up on other online stuff) but there is some sort of Formula One racing thing on (so I’m super not paying attention) until I start hearing the name “Jensen” popping up in the race and I’m like what and turns out there is an F1 racer named Jenson Button and look at this attractive Brit and he drives a McLaren and lives in Monaco what even

image

thefandomteapot:

¤♥¤Oº°‘¨☜♥☞¤ ADVENTURE TIME GIVEAWAY  ¤☜♥☞¨‘°ºO¤♥¤

BECAUSE i am terribly lonely with my partner in crime now in sweden, i am doing this giveaway image

PRIZES: image

  • 1st place - 8pc. Adventure Time Mocha Set (winner may choose from the original or genderbent sets, substitutions for characters acceptable too )
  • 2nd place - Adventure Time themed Bobu (winner may choose the two characters and a background)
  • 3rd place - Finn and Jake Keychain and Sun Keychain 

THE RULES:

  • Reblog and Like to enter until Nov. 15, 2014.One winner will be chosen at random after midnight (PST), no giveaway tumblrs please. 
  • You must be following us to enter. i’m lonely, so this is for those people making me less so.
  • You must be comfortable giving us your shipping address.
  • Your ask box must be open!!
  • We must receive a response within 48 hours, or a new winner will be chosen.

*questions please feel free to ask :) 

**multiple reblogs, etc are fine

super-who-locked-in:

elenilote:

kateordie:

I hope the makers of this are ready to be millionaires

WHERE CAN I GET THIS

drink until the homicidal thoughts pass

I need because obviously

Babies

Babies

anna-mator:

anna-mator:

Certain circumstances have left me resorting to couch surfing. With no source of steady income, moving into a new place isn’t easy. Which is why I’m opening my storenvy again. All products in the store will be under pre-order status until I have enough money to buy postage and ship them out, which will most likely be by the 25th of this month.

You can visit and order from the store here.

And you can donate here.

Thank you.

No longer couch surfing, but I need rent because I’m jobless atm. Please reblog if you can’t afford to help out right now.

thepeoplesrecord:

Columbia student will carry her mattress until her rapist exits school
September 2, 2014

While most students at Columbia University will spend the first day of classes carrying backpacks and books, Emma Sulkowicz will start her semester on Tuesday with a far heavier burden. The senior plans on carrying an extra-long, twin-size mattress across the quad and through each New York City building – to every class, every day – until the man she says raped her moves off campus.

“I was raped in my own bed,” Sulkowicz told me the other day, as she was gearing up to head back to school in this, the year American colleges are finally, supposedly, ready to do something about sexual assault. “I could have taken my pillow, but I want people to see how it weighs down a person to be ignored by the school administration and harassed by police.”

Sulkowicz is one of three women who made complaints to Columbia against the same fellow senior, who was found “not responsible” in all three cases. She alsofiled a police report, but Sulkowicz was treated abysmally – by the cops, and by a Columbia disciplinary panel so uneducated about the scourge of campus violence that one panelist asked how it was possible to be anally raped without lubrication.

So Sulkowicz joined a federal complaint in April over Columbia’s mishandling of sexual misconduct cases, and she will will hoist that mattress on her shoulders as part savvy activism, part performance art. “The administration can end the piece, by expelling him,” she says, “or he can, by leaving campus.”

Read more

As painful as I know the constant reminder of attending school with her rapist must be, I’m glad she won’t be the only one forced to remember. I hope the rapist drops out immediately…or better yet, I hope he faces the justice he deserves. 

Yooooo I went from Kale Preferred class to Turquoise Executive class. Is this thanks to FEGVEP? Because whoa.